Theatre Arts and Dance

Theatre Arts and Dance


Changes effective Fall Term 2014

Barnes Cavenaugh Charles Cody-Rapport
Griffin Miller Mobley Ouellette
Sherry Zivot


The theatre major offers a comprehensive education in the art and craft of the theatre. The curriculum exposes students broadly to theatre history, literature, theory, and criticism, and provides rigorous training in acting, directing, design, and technical theatre. To achieve these skills, students complete a series of required courses and participate in the departmental production program.

 

Philosophy

 

The Rollins College Department of Theatre Arts and Dance believes that theatrical productions and classroom study are of equal and complementary value.

The faculty of the Department of Theatre Arts and Dance embraces the liberal arts mission of Rollins College. The study of theatre comes most fully to life when integrated with other disciplines, for example, psychology, English, sociology, art, music, classical studies, and history. The faculty strongly encourages its majors to complement their studies with those of other departments.

Performance

 The department produces eight (8) theatre and dance productions per year at two on-campus venues: the Annie Russell Theatre, a 377-seat proscenium theatre listed on the National Registry of Historic Places, and the Fred Stone Theatre, a 90-seat black box space.

Majors take a set of courses and concentrate in performance, design and technical theatre, musical theatre, dramaturgy, or theatre studies. The department issues a comprehensive reading list of theatre literature for majors. Faculty evaluate student progress at the end of the sophomore year, and seniors must complete a senior capstone experience.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

Fifty-four (54) credit hours are required, including:

  • a core of eleven (11) courses,
    all majors take a core sequence of seven (7) four-hour courses and four (4) two-hour production courses; and
  • an emphasis in one (1) of six (6) areas,
    all majors select an area of emphasis consisting of five (4) four-hour courses and a two-hour capstone course.

CORE COURSES

  • THE 111 Introduction to Technical Theatre
  • THE 112 Fundamentals of Theatrical Design
  • THE 133 Acting I: Fundamentals
  • THE 201 Script Analysis
  • THE 210 Survey of Western Dramatic Literature
  • THE 341 History of the Theatre I
  • THE 342 History of the Theatre II OR DAN 200 Dance in America
  • Four (4) from among these five (5) courses: THE 418, 419, 420, 421 Theatre Production (Technical), or DAN 422 Dance Production.

EMPHASES

  • Design/Technical Theatre
  • Directing
  • Performance
  • Musical Theatre
  • Dramaturgy
  • Theatre Studies

Design/Technical Theatre Emphasis

  • THE 221 Design/Technical Theatre Studio
  • THE 333 Directing I: Fundamentals
  • Two (2) of the following:
    • THE 321 Scene Design
    • THE 322 Lighting Design
    • THE 323 Costume Design
    • THE 324 Sound Design
  • THE 481 Senior Design/Technical Theatre Portfolio/Capstone

Directing Emphasis

  • One (1) of the following:
    • THE 135 Dance for Actors
    • THE 136 Voice and Speech I: Free Voice
    • THE 234 Movement I: Body Dynamics
  • One (1) of the following:
    • THE 321 Scene Design
    • THE 322 Lighting Design
    • THE 323 Costume Design
    • THE 324 Sound Design
  • THE 333 Directing I: Fundamentals
  • THE 433 Directing II: Advanced
  • THE 480 Senior Theatre Directing Project/Capstone

Performance Emphasis

  • Two (2) of the following:
    • THE 135 Dance for Actors
    • THE 136 Voice and Speech I: Free Voice
    • THE 234 Movement I: Body Dynamics
  • One (1) of the following:
    • THE 225 Improvisational Theatre I: Fundamentals
    • THE 236 Voice and Speech II: Vocal Dynamics
    • THE 333 Directing I: Fundamentals
    • THE 336 Theatre for Social Change
    • THE 355 Acting for the Musical Theatre
  • THE 233 Acting II: Character w/Laboratory
  • THE 480 Senior Theatre Performance Project/Capstone

DRAMATURGY

  • THE 341 History of Theatre I (in core courses)
  • THE 342 History of Theatre II (in core courses)
  • One (1) of the following:
    • THE 328 Fundamentals of Playwriting
    • THE 343 Dramatic Theory and Criticism
  • One (1) of the following:
    • ENG 312 Studies in Shakespeare
    • ENG 319 Studies in 20th-Century British Literature
    • ENG 375 The Critics Role: Review Writing
  • Two (2) of the following:
    • THE 241 Classical Theatre
    • THE 260 Feminist Theatre
    • THE 294 History of American Theatre
    • THE 360 Forbidden Acts: The Queer Aesthetic in 20th Century Theatre and Film
  • THE 480 Senor Theatre Thesis/Capstone

Theatre Studies Emphasis

  • One (1) of the following:
    • THE 135 Dance for Actors
    • THE 136 Voice and Speech I: Free Voice
    • THE 234 Movement I: Body Dynamics
  • One (1) of the following:
    • THE 321 Scene Design
    • THE 322 Lighting Design
    • THE 323 Costume Design
    • THE 324 Sound Design
  • One (1) of the following:
    • ENG 312 Studies in Shakespeare
    • THE 205 History of American Musical Theatre
    • THE 225 Improvisational Theatre I: Fundamentals
    • THE 328 Fundamentals of Playwriting
    • THE 336 Theatre for Social Change
  • THE 333 Directing I
  • THE 480 Senior Theatre Thesis/Capstone

MUSICAL THEATRE EMPHASIS

  • One (1) of the following:
    • MUS 151 Theory I
    • MUA 101/102 Applied Music for Enrichment I/II
  • One (1) of the following:
    • DAN 177 Jazz Dance I
    • DAN 175/275 Tap I and II
    • DAN 394 Intermediate/Advanced Dance Technique
  • THE 355 Acting for the Musical Theatre
  • THE 455 Acting for Musical Theatre II
  • THE 480 Senior Theatre Performance Project/Capstone

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

The minor offers a basic education in the art and craft of theatre. Students become familiar with theatre history, literature, theory, and criticism, and become competent in acting, design, and technical theatre. To achieve these skills, students complete a series of required courses and participate in the departmental production program.

Twenty-eight (28) credit hours are required.

  • Six (6) four-hour courses
  • Two (2) two-hour production courses
  • THE 111 Introduction to Technical Theatre
  • THE 112 Fundamentals of Theatrical Design
  • THE 133 Acting I: Fundamentals
  • THE 210 Survey of Western Dramatic Literature
  • One (1) of the following:
    • THE 135 Dance for Actors
    • THE 234 Movement I
    • DAN 170 Ballet I
    • DAN 177 Jazz I
    • DAN 179 Modern Dance I
  • One (1) elective at the 200-400 level
  • Two (2) from among these five (5) courses: THE 418, 419, 420, 421 Theatre Production (Technical), or DAN 422 Dance Production.

 

Course of Study


THE 100 Introduction to the Theatre
: Surveys history of theatre art and crafts. Discusses major plays and playwrights, physical stage, dramatic criticism, acting, directing, stagecraft, design, and other relevant crafts. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 111 Introduction to Technical Theatre: Introduces scenery, properties, scene painting, costumes, lighting, stage management, and drafting. Includes lecture and production projects in each area.

THE 112 Fundamentals of Theatrical Design: Examines through weekly projects the creative process fundamental to designing for stage. Focuses on visual communication and critical response. Includes drawing, painting, collage, and research projects.

THE 113 Fundamentals of Makeup for the Theatre: Explores basics of makeup application, creation of character makeup, and masks for stage. Combines one-hour lecture/demonstration with two-hour lab each week.

THE 131 Introduction to Acting: Nonmajor: Combines study and practice of basic rehearsal and performance techniques. Emphasizes evolution of performer's role.

THE 133 Acting I: Fundamentals: Focuses on development of actor in audition and performance. Develops concentration, imagination, relaxation, and voice production through individual and ensemble exercises. Prerequisite: consent.

THE 135 Dance for Actors: Covers stage movement for actors. Features exercises in coordination, rhythmic ability, and body mechanics.

THE 136 Voice and Speech I: Free Voice: Investigates the fundamental principles and functionality of voice production and speech mechanics. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 201 Script Analysis: Analyzes structure, style, theme, and characterization in plays from a variety of historical periods. Discusses stage worthiness of scripts and theories affecting creative interpretation and performance. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 203 History of American Film: Chronicles development of movies and political and socioeconomic impact of film industry from early 20th century to present. Requires evening movie viewing. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 205 History of American Musical Theatre: Traces development from early and current European influences to present American musicals. Analyzes political, social, and musical styles. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 206 History of Radio and Television: Surveys broadcasting from 1900 to present: inventions, trends, programs, events, and personalities. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 207 American Dreams: Interrogating Identity Through Drama: Surveys American Dramatic Literature from the last 100 years to discover the myriad of ways in which American identities have been variously formed, disrupted, negotiated, and transformed. Using dramatic literature and accompanying criticism as a lens, students will interrogate mythologies of "The American Dream" and investigate the ways in which playwrights explore and construct American identity in various cultural and social contexts.

THE 210 Survey of Western Dramatic Literature: Covers major playwrights, genres, and dramatic texts from Ancient Greek tragedy to modern American realism and beyond. Evaluates the ways in which Western culture has (mis)represented itself and others onstage and given meaning to the human experience. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 220 History of American Musical Film: Historical overview of the American film musical from its inception in the 1920's to the present. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 221 Design/Technical Theatre Studio: Addresses the communication between theatrical design and technology. In a studio setting, students learn advanced techniques to design, draw, construct, paint, sculpt, sew, and light a variety of projects. Prerequisites: THE 111, THE 211, or consent.

THE 225 Improvisational Theatre I: Fundamentals: Investigates the fundamental concepts and principles of improvisational theatre that enable collaborative, spontaneous play. Particular emphasis is given to issues of storyline, scenic structure, and team-based creativity. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 233 Acting II: Character w/Laboratory: Prepares actor to express believable, repeatable actions in scene work and monologues through text analysis, improvisation, and exercises. Stresses techniques of finding and playing objectives and intentions. Prerequisites: THE 111 and THE 133.

THE 234 Movement I: Body Dynamics: Explores the physical demands placed on the actor. Techniques learned are for finding a basic knowledge of the body's energies. Skills taught may include: dance technique, improvisation, mime, Pilates, unarmed combat, and physical improvisation. Prerequisites: THE 133-required, THE 136-suggested.

THE 236 Voice and Speech II: Vocal Dynamics: Investigates advanced principles and functionality of voice production and speech mechanics. Intended for THE majors/minors. Prerequisite: THE 136.

THE 241 Classical Theatre: Follows development of classical tragedy and comedy through readings in translation -- drama from Aeschylus to O'Neill and theory from Plato to Nietzsche. Considers mythology, architectural and scenic innovations, and connections between religion and theatre. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 248 Audition Techniques: An in-depth study of the conditions surrounding and within the audition experience. Examines various audition environments and the techniques, knowledge, and skills required to be effective in both theatre and media auditions.

THE 249 Acting for the Camera: Classes build from the student's use of Stanislavsky's System and the Triune Brain. Aims to train the actor for the technical demands of acting on a film or television set. Prerequisite: THE 133 or consent.

THE 260 Feminist Theatre: Examines theatre companies and practitioners throughout the world who have committed themselves to telling "women's stories" in various types of performances, ranging from traditional plays to performance art. Explores the ways in which a feminist perspective shapes both the content and form of theatrical practice.

THE 295 History of American Theatre: The history of American theatre from 1665 to the present day. Examines trends, productions, dramatic texts, and theatre personnel who have helped to shape theatre in America.

THE 321 Scene Design: Applies creative concepts, text analysis, research, and visual communication techniques to scenic design. Draws texts from varying time periods and styles. Develops drawing and painting skills. Prerequisites: THE 111 and THE 211, or consent.

THE 322 Lighting Design: Applies creative concepts, text analysis, research, and visual communication techniques to lighting design projects in varying mediums. Develops drafting skills. Prerequisites: THE 111 and THE 211, or consent.

THE 323 Costume Design: Applies creative concepts, text analysis, research, and visual communication techniques to costume design. Draws texts from varying time periods and styles. Develops drawing and painting skills. Prerequisites: THE 111 and THE 211, or consent.

THE 324 Sound Design: Explores the role of sound in theatrical production as both an artistic and technical discipline. Develops a working knowledge of the equipment and vocabulary associated with theatrical sound. Integrates this working knowledge with the artistic theory and practical application of designing sound for the theatre. Prerequisite: THE 111 or consent.

THE 325 Improvisational Theatre II: Focus and Spontaneity: Explores a specific area of improvisational performance such as focus and spontaneity, characterization and status, physicality and environment, verbal skills and styles, or long-form and advanced structures. May be repeated for credit. Suitable for nonmajors. Prerequisite: THE 225 or consent.

THE 328 Fundamentals of Playwriting: Critiques student scripts and established work. Stages scenes from student plays or exercises in collaboration with acting/directing courses.

THE 331 Acting III: Period Styles: Explores acting in various periods and styles through reading, research, and scene work. Expands performer's agility through exercises in physical theatre and mask work. Requires journals reflecting research. Prerequisite: THE 233 or consent.

THE 332 Acting IV: Scene Study: Emphasizes actors skills in oral interpretation through exercises in energy and language imagery. Continues work in scene study and characterization. Introduces International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and use of dialects. Prerequisite: THE 331 or consent.

THE 333 Directing I: Fundamentals: Introduces directing terminology, formulation of ground plan, communication with actors, and concepts such as visual pause, beats, and blocking. Requires students to prepare exercises and scripted scenes from contemporary plays. Prerequisites: THE 111, THE 133, THE 201, and THE 211.

THE 336 Theatre for Social Change: Introduces and explores modern theatrical practices that utilize performance to facilitate heightened social awareness and/or change. May consider a variety of performance practices, such as: theatre of the oppressed, community-based theatre, psycho/sociodrama, theatre-in-education, and playback theatre. Prerequisite: THE 133, or THE 225, or consent.

THE 337 Voice III-Dialects: Covers the process of speech mechanics associated with patterns of speech other than Standard American. Requires knowledge of the International Phonetic Alphabet and Standard American Speech. Prerequisite: THE 136 or consent.

THE 340 Rollins Improv Players Laboratory: An improvisatory laboratory for students interested in exploring the boundaries of spontaneous and service-centered performance. Prerequisite: audition and consent. Graded on a credit/no-credit (CR/NC) basis. May be repeated for credit.

THE 341/342 History of the Theatre I and II: Surveys major periods beginning with classical Greek, focusing on theatre architecture, styles of production, key personalities, and relationship of dramatic literature to production styles. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 343 Dramatic Theory and Criticism: Surveys important trends in performance theory and criticism from the pre-Socratic and Plato, to postmodernism and queer theory. Examines the ways in which the art of representation has been viewed, pursued, and misconstrued. Prerequisite: THE 210 or consent.

THE 350 Topics in Theatre: Explores practitioners, theorists, and historians in the field of theatre and dance. Second Stage series is the capstone of the course -- student directed, designed, and performed productions in the Fred Stone Theatre.

THE 351 Shakespeare Dramaturgy: Students will read, analyze, and explore a broad range of Shakespearian drama and tropes as a means and inspiration for generating written critical analysis and embodied creative performance.

THE 355 Acting for the Musical Theatre: Delves into textual/lyric analysis and history and context of different writing styles (including classical aria, 19th-century patter song, American standard, and Broadway and West End musical). Prerequisite:  consent.

THE 360 Forbidden Acts: The Queer Aesthetic in 20th Century Theatre & Film: Introduces students to aesthetics and theories through an examination of plays and films made by contemporary queer artists. Course develops students' abilities to read, view, and write about dramatic literature and film, as well as scholarly articles through a Queer Theoretical lens. Culminates in a performance piece that is conceived or adapted, rehearsed, and produced as a response to the material presented.

THE 391/392/393 Second Stage: Production: Departmental laboratory for student directors, designers, stage managers, and performers. Provides hands-on experience in all areas related to the production of a play. Prerequisite: consent.

THE 418/419, 420/421 Theatre Production -- Technical: Provides practical experience in technical/design work on major productions at Annie Russell Theatre. Assigns students to crews: scenic construction, props, painting, stage management, lights, sound, costumes, and make-up. Requires minimum 10 hours per week and attendance at weekly production meetings. Note: Majors must work in each of the following four areas: painting/props, stage management/lighting/sound, costumes/make-up, and scenic construction.

THE 422/423, 424/425 Theatre Production Performance A/B, C/D: Offers practical rehearsal/performance experience for major production at Annie Russell Theatre. Requires journal and final character analysis. Prerequisite: consent.

THE 433 Directing II: Advanced: Focuses on artistic collaboration, historical research, themes, and directorial vision. Emphasizes preparation and presentation of period scenes: Greek/Roman, Shakespearean, absurdist, and postmodern. Culminates in presentation of scenes for public viewing. Prerequisite: THE 333.

THE 440 Senior Studio Workshop: Prepares students for postgraduate study by developing auditions and portfolios. Culminates in public presentations. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: senior standing or consent.

THE 455 Acting for Musical Theatre II: Continued investigation into textual/lyric analysis and history, and context of different writing styles (including classical aria, 19th-century patter song, American standard, and Broadway and West End musical). Emphasis on musical theatre theory and terminology, text and sub-textual characterization, and the audition process. Prerequisite: THE 355 or consent.

THE 480 Theatre Capstone: Serves as the culminating project, performance, or document for theatre majors in the acting, musical theatre, directing, theatre studies, or dramaturgy concentrations. With approval and guidance from faculty, students may elect to complete their capstone experience as a portfolio, performance, or critical/historical document.

THE 481 Design/Technical Theatre Capstone: Focuses on designing and developing an aesthetically pleasing portfolio that incorporates a capstone and demonstrates the student's capabilities and achievements for presentation at graduate school and professional interviews. Prerequisite: senior standing or consent.

THE 398-399, 498-499 Senior Project/Research/Internship/Tutorial: Offers four types of individual study:

  • Senior Project -- Focuses on independent production project in acting, directing, design/technical theatre, or management. A comprehensive examination is given in the spring term of the senior year. Prerequisites: senior standing and theatre major.
  • Research Project -- Involves independent research in theatre history, criticism, literature, design, playwriting, acting, or directing. Culminates in major research paper. Prerequisites: junior standing and theatre major
  • Internship -- Places student with professional performing arts organization for one semester. Host or faculty advisor monitors student's work. Prerequisites: junior/senior standing, theatre major, and approval by career services and department in semester prior to enrollment.
  • Tutorial -- Involves intensive research, writing, or production with instructor. May not duplicate regular course offering. Meets weekly and requires presentation and exam. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent.

Dance (minor only)

Sherry

This program gives students the opportunity to experience dance as an art form. They can take studio classes in ballet, jazz, tap, and modern dance, as well as courses in history, notation, and composition. Minors develop an awareness of history, an understanding of composition, and a competency in several forms.

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

 Six (6) courses are required, four (4) core courses and two (2) electives.

CORE COURSES

  • DAN 200 Dance in America OR DAN 203 Dance History
  • DAN 300 Dance Composition
  • DAN 394 Intermediate/Advanced Dance Technique (taken twice)

ELECTIVES

Two (2) of the following courses are required.

  • DAN 170 Ballet I
  • DAN 175 Tap Dance I
  • DAN 177 Jazz I
  • DAN 179 Modern Dance I
  • DAN 200 Dance in America
  • DAN 203 Dance History
  • DAN 220 Women Leaders in American Modern Dance
  • DAN 270 Ballet II
  • DAN 275 Tap Dance II
  • DAN 277 Jazz II
  • DAN 279 Modern Dance II
  • DAN 300 Dance Composition
  • DAN 380 Studies in Dance
  • DAN 394 Intermediate/Advanced Dance Technique
  • DAN 420 Labanotation
  • DAN 422 Dance Production
  • THE 135 Dance for Actors

 

Course of Study


DAN 170 Ballet I
:
Introduces fundamental concepts and historical background. Presents positions and barre exercises to build correct alignment, flexibility, strength, coordination, and ballet vocabulary.

DAN 175 Tap: Introduces fundamental concepts and historical background. Covers basic time steps, waltz clog, triplets, shim-sham, buffalo, cramp roll, and soft-shoe, along with tap vocabulary.

DAN 177 Jazz I: Introduces fundamental concepts and historical background. Works in studio on body placement and alignment through highly-structured classical jazz warm-up (LUIGI). Values clarity and quality of movement, rhythm, style, and use of dynamics.

DAN 179 Modern Dance I: Introduces fundamental concepts and historical background. Focuses on style, phrasing, mood projection, and changing dynamics.

DAN 200 Dance in America: Studies relationships of choreographers, critics, and performers to historical trends in the art form. Links dance to contemporary political and social issues.

DAN 203 Dance History: Follows evolution of Western concert dance from primitive times to late 20th century: dance in ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome; Ballet Comique; Opéra Ballet; Ballet d'Action; and romantic ballet.

DAN 210 Dances of Other Cultures: Explores various regional and ethnic dances with a focus on non-Western dance as an expression of culture. Participation in selected dances will be augmented by lecture and film.

DAN 220 Women Leaders in American Modern Dance: Transcending from Sylph to Heroine: Examines the women who led the modern dance movement from 1900 to present. Focuses on choreographic works and politics surrounding the development of modern dance in America through its leaders -- Isadora Duncan, Ruth St. Denis, Doris Humphery, Martha Graham, Catherine Dunham, and Twyla Tharp.

DAN 270 Ballet II: Drills pirouettes and longer and more complex "adages" and "allegros." Completes ballet theory and essentials of technique. Prerequisite: DAN 170 or consent.

DAN 275 Tap Dance II: Explores technique on an intermediate level, including all time steps (buck, soft-shoe, traveling, wing), Irish-over, Cincinnati, draw-backs, pick-ups, wings, maxiford, and riffs. Stresses speed, accuracy, and performance ability. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: DAN 175 or consent.

DAN 277 Jazz II: Concentrates studio work on more complicated combinations, changes of direction, and initiation of pirouettes. Includes historical research, critical studies, and vocabulary building. Prerequisite: DAN 177 or consent.

DAN 279 Modern Dance II: Builds on technique and includes history, theory, and vocabulary. Prerequisite: DAN 179 or consent.

DAN 300 Dance Composition: Introduces dance composition. Highlights personal invention, solo and group focus, and evaluative process in basic choreography. Includes readings and writings on choreographers and choreography. May be repeated for credit. Intended for dance minors. Prerequisite: DAN 394 or consent.

DAN 380 Studies in Dance: Delves into particular period, choreographer's work, or special issue, depending on interest of students and faculty. May be repeated for credit.

DAN 394 Intermediate/Advanced Dance Technique: Offers heightened movement experience with greater emphasis on technical development and performance. Includes weekly classes in ballet, jazz, and modern dance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent.

DAN 420 Labanotation: Teaches system of movement notation invented by Rudolph Van Laban and used in dance, sports, science, and other research areas. Does not require knowledge of dance. Consists of lecture, studio work, and movement-recording exercises.

DAN 422 Dance Production: Assigns students to performing or technical/design role in production. Prerequisite: consent.