Videos & Lectures

Robert Henri's Sense of Place:
CFAM Curator Amy Galpin

March 14, 2014

Robert Henri possessed a profound connection to place. Whether it was Ireland, Spain, New Mexico, California, or Maine, Henri was attracted to disparate places and the various people he encountered. This talk places his painting Mountain Ash, Dark Woods, 1911, located in the permanent collection of the Cornell Fine Arts Museum, in context with other works by the artist and his contemporaries.

Ghosts of Brutality:
John Hitchcock

February 11, 2014

Join artist John Hitchcock as he speaks on his artistic process in relation to the exhibition Ghosts of Brutality, on view at CFAM through April 13, 2014.  Hitchcock uses the print medium with its long history of commenting on social and political issues to explore his relationships to community, land, and culture. Hitchcock’s depictions of beasts, animals, repeat patterns, biological diagrams, symbols from nature, and machines act as metaphors for human behavior and cycles of violence. His artwork is a response to intrusive behavior by humans towards nature and other humans.

John Hitchcock is an Artist and Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he teaches screenprinting, relief cut, and installation art. He earned his MFA in printmaking and photography at Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas and received his BFA from Cameron University, Lawton, Oklahoma. His current works depict personal, social, and political views that are a blend of printmaking, digital imaging, video, and installation.

This lecture is made possible by the Thomas P. Johnson Distinguished Visiting Scholar Fund.

Chasing Gustav Manz:  A Jewery Adventure
Laura Mathews

February 4, 2014

From the Belle Epoque to the Great Depression, Gustav Manz (1865–1946) designed and fabricated jewelry for important New York firms such as Tiffany, Cartier, Marcus & Co, Black Starr & Frost, Raymond Yard and many others. While his name was unknown to the general public (his creations usually carried the retailer’s mark) Manz’s reputation was legendary among wholesalers and manufacturers. With help from jewelry scholars, and combing Manz’s design book and business archive for their road map, his great-granddaughters, Laura and Cuyler Mathews, have uncovered his pieces in estate sales, jewelry exhibits, and private collections. In this talk at the museum, Laura shares their finds and insights about Manz’s studio and his part in jewelry history.

Laura Mathews has been a magazine editor, fiction editor, and book reviewer for the last 25 years. She began her career at The Atlantic Monthly, and went on to work at Glamour, G.P Putnam’s Sons, and Martha Stewart Living. She is currently the Literary Editor at Good Housekeeping, and serves on the board of the James Merrill House writer-in-residence program in Stonington, CT

This lecture is made possible by the Thomas P. Johnson Distinguished Visiting Scholar Fund.

Matisse as Printmaker:
Jay Fisher

January 21, 2014

Henri Matisse was deeply engaged with making prints, drawings, illustrated books, sculptures, and, of course, the paintings for which he is best known. Each medium, which he would often work on simultaneously, offered the unique possibilities and challenges that advanced his creative process. Printmaking was most closely allied to drawing—his primary means of studying a subject in his studio. Prints provided the artist the opportunity to work in series, moving his subject beyond initial observation, and to share his transformative vision with a larger audience.

Join Jay Fisher, Senior Curator of Prints, Drawings & Photographs and Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs at The Baltimore Museum of Art as he speaks in relation to the exhibition he curated—Matisse as Printmaker: Works from the Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation—on view at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum through March 16, 2014.

This lecture is made possible by the Thomas P. Johnson Distinguished Visiting Scholar Fund.

Dialogues with Collectors: 
Dr. Gary Vikan

December 3, 2013

Internationally known medieval art scholar and a national arts leader, Dr. Gary Vikan was the Director of the Walters Art Museum for almost 20 years.  During his tenure the Walters saw a major building renovation, contextual reinstallations of its collections (from ancient to the 19th century), the addition of three major collections (Arts of India, Nepal, and Tibet; South-East Asian Art; and Arts of the Ancient Americas) and the acquisition of the finest collection of Ethiopian art outside of its native country.

Join Dr. Vikan as he shares his experiences of nurturing, expanding, and diversifying the unique collection of the Walters Art Museum, located in Baltimore, Maryland, and the challenges that came with being the steward of such a collection.

This lecture is made possible by the Thomas P. Johnson Distinguished Visiting Scholar Fund.

Dialogues with Collectors: 
Sarah Cash

NOVEMBER 19, 2013

Sarah Cash, the Corcoran Gallery of Art's Bechhoefer Curator of American Art, highlights recent findings on the Corcoran Gallery of Art’s rich holdings of historic American paintings while tracing the fascinating history of America’s oldest dedicated art museum.

This lecture is made possible by the Thomas P. Johnson Distinguished Visiting Scholar Fund.


Tim Rollins and K.O.S., a history

OCTOBER 11, 2013

Tim Rollins,  artist and teacher,  speaks on his relationship with students in the Bronx and the development of Kids of Survival (K.O.S.).  Tim Rollins and K.O.S. are the creators of A Midsummer's Night Dream, part of the Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art at Rollins College currently on view at the Alfond Inn in Winter Park, FL.


Dialogues with Collectors: 
Dr. Helen Evans

OCTOBER 1, 2013

Dr.  Helen Evans,  Mary and Michael C. Jaharis Curator of Byzantine Art at  the Metropolitan Museum of Art explores the evolution and concepts driving the acquisition and display of this collection.

This lecture is made possible by the Thomas P. Johnson Distinguished Visiting Scholar Fund.

 


Nazi-Looted Art:  Unfinished Business

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2013
7:00 p.m.

Nazi plunder during Hitler’s regime and particularly during World War II was arguably the greatest theft of cultural property in history. Its aftermath lingers still: more than sixty years later, efforts to find looted art and return it to its rightful owners continue on both sides of the Atlantic. This panel discusses some recent such efforts, from those connected to the case of Max Stern (featured in the past exhibition , Auktion 392: Reclaiming the Galerie Stern, Düsseldorf) to other recently closed and ongoing cases, including some in Florida.

Participants:

- David Glasser, Executive Chairman, Ben Uri, The London Jewish Museum of Art (moderator);

- Howard N. Spiegler, Partner, Herrick, Feinstein, LLP; Co-chair, Art Law Group, New York;

- Dr. Roger Ward, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, Mississippi Museum of Art, Jackson.

This lecture is made possible by the Thomas P. Johnson Distinguished Visiting Scholar Fund.


Dialogues with Collectors: 
Susan Rosoff

The second in the series of dialogue about collecting, this conversation by Susan Rosoff, an art museum consultant and former museum educator at the Orlando Museum of Art, speaks about the collection of modern art assembled by her parents, Harvie and Mardelle Merrill.

This lecture is made possible by the Thomas P. Johnson Distinguished Visiting Scholar Fund.


Dialogues with Collectors: 
Roberta Green Ahmanson

This series of dialogue expands on the collecting theme of CFAM's 35th anniversary exhibitions by opening a conversation about why, what and how people collect, and the role of the collecting instinct as a vital part of preserving our history.

In this video, Roberta Green Ahmanson, writer and philanthropist and current chair of the board of MOBIA (Museum of Biblical Art), New York City, speaks about her private collection of biblical art and the Ahmanson family collecting legacy.

This lecture is made possible by the Thomas P. Johnson Distinguished Visiting Scholar Fund.


Reading the Bible Aesthetically

Dr. Ena Heller, Bruce A. Beal Director of The Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, speaks on how the Bible–the most influential book in Western culture– ties into the world of visual art.  This presentation focuses on some poignant examples, from the early centuries of the Common Era when Christianity was crafting a new artistic vocabulary, to medieval Europe and 20th century painting.  

 


Likewise, as Technical Experts, but not (at all) by Way of Culture:  A time lapse video

Take a look at the process involved for the installation of this recent Leigh-Ann Pahapill exhibition.  Follow the creation of the artist from start to finish.