Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

The Graduate Studies in Counseling Program at Rollins College is unique in its commitment to fostering a transformative experience through personal growth and self-awareness, which will enhance your professional capacity in the field of clinical mental health counseling. 

overview

The Graduate Studies in Counseling Program at Rollins College is unique in its commitment to fostering a transformative experience through personal growth and self-awareness, which will enhance your professional capacity in the field of clinical mental health counseling. We are also unique among graduate programs for offering advanced training in group counseling theory and practice.

Emphasizing the core values of multiculturalism and social justice, the program provides you the clinical skills, practical experience, and ethical foundation essential for a successful career in counseling. As a result, you will graduate among the most qualified, sought-after job candidates in the region.

curriculum

The Rollins Graduate Studies in Counseling Program offers an interactive, experiential curriculum that meets the highest and most recent CACREP accreditation and state licensure standards. Late afternoon and early evening classes, structured for 12 to 15 students, provide individualized instruction.

In accordance with the requirements for licensure as a mental health counselor in the state of Florida, the program requires completion of a 60-semester-hour curriculum which may be completed on a full-time three-year track, a four-year part-time track, or a five-year part-time track (with department approval).

For more current curriculum information, please visit the Rollins catalog >>

Core Curriculum

CPY 510                 Foundations in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

CPY 515                 Fundamentals of Statistics, Research, and Program Evaluation

CPY 520                 Group Dynamics and Process

CPY 525                 Counseling Theories and Practice

CPY 530                 Theories of Personality

CPY 535                 Career and Lifestyle Development

CPY 538                 Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling

CPY 540                 Advanced Theory and Practice of Group Counseling

CPY 545                 Legal, Professional, and Ethical Issues in Counseling

CPY 550                 Dynamics of Marriage, Relationship, and Family Systems

CPY 555                 Family and Relationship Counseling: Theory and Therapeutic Modalities

CPY 560                 Community Counseling and Crisis Intervention

CPY 565                 Individual/Group Assessment and Treatment Planning

CPY 601                 Human Sexuality: Therapy, Counseling Theory, and Techniques

CPY 602                 Human Growth and Development

CPY 603                 Addictive Disorders

CPY 699                 Master Therapist Series

PSY 551                  Psychopathology: Diagnosis and Assessment of Abnormal Behavior

PSY 660                  Pre-practicum in Counseling and Social Justice Advocacy

PSY 680                  Practicum and Internship I in a Clinical Mental Health Setting

PSY 695                  Internship II in a Clinical Mental Health Setting

Certificate Program in Family and Relationship Therapy

Currently enrolled degree-seeking students of the Rollins Graduate Studies in Counseling Program are also eligible to apply for admission to the Certificate Program in Family and Relationship Therapy.

The Certificate Program in Family and Relationship Therapy requires students to complete 20 semester hours of credit. These include 10 hours of core courses in family and relationship therapy and 10 hours of internship at a site that offers the opportunity to counsel families and couples from a relationship or systemic perspective as described by Florida Statute 491 and Florida Administrative Code 64B4.

Core Curriculum

CPY 550                Dynamics of Marriage, Relationship, and Family Systems

CPY 555                Family and Relationship Counseling: Theory and Therapeutic Modalities

CPY 557                Couples and Marriage Therapy: Theory and Techniques (offered in spring)

CPY 559                Professional Seminar in Family and Relationship Therapy (offered in summer)

PSY 695                 Internship II in a Clinical Mental Health Setting 

faculty

The Rollins Graduate Studies in Counseling Program professors are nationally certified and licensed professional counselors who are committed to providing students with active learning and real-world experience.

Core Faculty

Alicia M. Homrich, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Counseling

B.S., M.S., Florida International University; M.A., Rollins College; Ph.D., University of Georgia; Licensed Psychologist; Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist; National Certified Counselor

Professor Alicia Homrich is a 1992 graduate of the Rollins Graduate Studies in Counseling Program. Her greatest interest is in the area of family therapy, with special emphasis on family strengths and resiliency. Areas of professional interest include group work, solution-focused brief therapy, and counselor training and supervision. Professor Homrich teaches internship, group work courses, and the family and relationship therapy course series.

 

Kathryn L. Norsworthy, Ph.D.
Professor of Counseling

B.S., Georgia Southwestern College; Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Postdoctoral Respecialization, University of Georgia; Licensed Psychologist; National Certified Counselor

Dr. Norsworthy’s clinical specialties include counseling and psychotherapy with adults with post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic and life-threatening illnesses, especially HIV/AIDS. Additional areas of expertise are social justice and multicultural applications in international counseling and peace building, feminist theory and practice, integration of Buddhist psychology and counselor training, and GLBT affirmative counseling. More information about Dr. Norsworthy.

 

Derrick A. Paladino, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Counseling

B.S., M.Ed., Ed.S., University of Florida; Ph.D., University of Arkansas; Licensed Mental Health Counselor; National Certified Counselor

Throughout his training, Dr. Paladino gained experience in crisis and emergency services, college counseling, and addictions and has worked in community/agency settings. His clinical specialties lie in crisis/suicide assessment and intervention, college student development, group counseling, identity development, and EMDR and clinical supervision. Research interests fall in the areas of multiracial identity and acculturation, college student adjustment, counselor education and supervision, and crisis assessment and intervention.

 

Samuel Sanabria, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Counseling

B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Florida; Licensed Mental Health Counselor; National Certified Counselor

Dr. Sanabria completed his doctorate in counselor education and supervision at the University of Florida in 2002 with an emphasis in diversity issues. He has extensive experience counseling couples, families, adults, and adolescents regarding sexual and gender identity concerns. His research interests include ethical practices in counseling, the development of prejudicial attitudes and beliefs, human sexuality, and Latino concerns. Dr. Sanabria teaches clinical practicum, multicultural counseling, psychopathology, and human sexuality.

Leigh de Armas DeLorenzi, Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor of Counseling

B.S., University of Miami; M.A., Rollins College; Ph.D., University of Central Florida

Dr. DeLorenzi’s clinical specialty lies in trauma therapy, specifically trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy and EMDR for adults and children. Her primary research focuses on the treatment attrition patterns of child sexual abuse victims as a function of their level of post-traumatic stress and trauma-related cognitive schemas. She currently works as a therapist with traumatized children at Kids House of Seminole. Other research interests include assessment development for victims of concurrent family violence, the use of meditation among people with addictions, multiracial identity and acculturation, and counseling theory selection and development.

 

Adjuncts

Burt Bertram, Ed.D.
Adjunct Professor of Counseling

B.S. Florida Atlantic University; M.Ed. Counseling, University of Central Florida; Ed.D. University of Florida; Licensed Mental Health Counselor; Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

Dr. Bertram has been in private practice in the Orlando area for more than 35 years and an adjunct professor and visiting professor at Rollins since 1994. His professional efforts focus on assisting individuals, couples, families, and work groups to productively identify, understand, and address the issues that are affecting their lives. He is co-author of The Counselor and the Law. He teaches Couples, Family, Ethics, Consultation, Practicum, and Internship.

Valorie Thomas, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Counseling

B.A., M.A., University of Central Florida; Ed.S. Ph.D., University of Florida; Licensed Mental Health Counselor; Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist; National Certified Counselor; Qualified Supervisor

Dr. Valorie Thomas, a former assistant professor at Stetson University, has been an adjunct faculty member for Rollins since 2001. She gained her clinical experience in managed mental health care, where she utilized solution-focused brief therapy emphasizing client strengths. Her interest areas include counselor education and supervision, legal and ethical issues/best practices in counseling, solution-focused brief therapy, group work, and infertility and early pregnancy loss. She is a co-author of Sexuality Counseling: An Integrative Approach. Dr. Thomas teaches classes in human sexuality, family and relationship counseling, legal and ethical issues, and practicum.

Anthony J. Schefstad, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Counseling

B.A., M.A. Rollins College; M.S.W., Ph.D. University of Maryland; Licensed Clinical Social Worker; Qualified Supervisor

Dr. Schefstad has been an adjunct faculty member for Rollins since 2000. He has provided direct clinical services in addictions, mental health, foster care, and trauma since 1984. He has supervised social work and mental health interns and family medicine and psychiatry residents. Dr. Schefstad was the EAP Coordinator for the Maryland Horseman’s Counseling Program and a member of the Team Assistance Program providing services to the Baltimore Orioles and minor league affiliates. Dr. Schefstad has training in hypnosis, neurolinguistic programming (NLP), brief solution-focused therapy and Eye Movement Integration. Dr. Schefstad is the executive director for the Volusia/Flagler County Coalition for the Homeless.

careers

After receiving their degrees, most graduates follow Florida state procedures and register as a counseling intern and complete the 3,000 hours of supervised clinical experience required to be licensed as a Florida Mental Health Counselor. During this time period, counseling interns may work in a variety of mental health settings, but may not practice on their own without an approved supervisor in that practice.

The following are examples of employers and settings for licensed and license-eligible graduates

  • Managed care organizations
  • Hospice
  • Mental health centers/agencies
  • Day treatment programs
  • Inpatient treatment programs
  • Partial hospital hospitalization programs
  • Outpatient programs of psychiatric and mental facilities
  • Juvenile justice residential programs
  • School-based mental health programs for children and families
  • Family counseling centers
  • Church-based counseling centers
  • Addictions treatment facilities – inpatient, day, outpatient, school-based
  • Medical hospitals for terminal illness
  • Wellness centers and programs
  • Home-based counseling programs
  • EAPs (Employee Assistance Programs)
  • Alternative schools (BETA, PACE, etc.)
  • Specialized centers – e.g., centers for grieving families, people with HIV
  • College counseling centers
  • Rape and abuse centers and shelters
  • Residential treatment programs for children and adolescents
  • Private or group practices
  • Practice within physicians’ offices, part of team
  • Victim advocacy programs

Additional sources of employment for graduates not pursuing licensure:

  • Human resources – working in profit and nonprofit organizations
  • Consultation
  • Mediation
  • Communications training, conflict management (either by freelancing or within a corporation)
  • Teacher in community colleges, some four-year colleges

june 15, 2014

The application deadline for the Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling has been extended to June 15, 2014 for the Fall 2014 cohort. Learn more about the application process.